Coping: Ideas that Change Pain

Oct 30, 2015

Coping-based healthcare is often misunderstood in society and, as a result, it is commonly neglected by healthcare providers and patients alike. Examples of such care are chronic pain rehabilitation for pain disorders, cardiac rehabilitation for heart disease, psychotherapy for mental health disorders, or diabetic education for diabetes. These therapies are often the last thing that healthcare providers recommend or the last thing people are willing to try, even though they are typically some of the most effective treatments for their respective conditions.

This misunderstanding and neglect is likely due to a number of reasons. Our healthcare system is set up for providers to focus on making patients well, not teaching them how to become well or get better at dealing with a health problem that won’t go away, such as chronic health conditions.

Another reason may be our shared desire for a quick fix. Understandably, when faced with a health problem, we often initially want something that will take it away, rather than coming to terms with the need to change our lifestyle in order to get healthier or become more effective at coping with the problem that we face.

Yet another reason is our societal misunderstanding of the role that genetics play in most of these chronic conditions. It’s not uncommon for people to report that their depression or back pain or heart disease or type II diabetes runs in their family, as if to say, there really isn’t much they can do about it. To be sure, at least some of these conditions, if not all of them, run in families, but a genetic predisposition is not destiny or fate. In all these conditions, the lifestyle choices we make in our lives also play a role and it's healthy changes in how we live our lives that can make all the difference.

There’s also something about going to see a healthcare provider to learn how to be healthier that just doesn’t seem as real or effective as going to see a healthcare provider for a medication  or a high-tech test or an injection or a surgery. Coping-based care, in other words, seems so intangible. Acute medical care is something that you can touch, see, hear, even smell at times. You walk away with medications in your hand, a dull ache at the site of where you got the injection, or a hospital wristband. Such tangibles are missing when you see your rehabilitation provider or your psychotherapist or your diabetic educator. You walk away with nothing but ideas on how to make healthy changes in your life. In other words, what you walk away with is all in your head.

Speaking of which, yet another reason why coping-based therapies get short shrift in our healthcare system is stigma. We all might intellectually acknowledge that we could make healthier choices in our lives or deal better with the chronic conditions that we have, but hardly anyone ever wants to openly acknowledge it to others for fear of being blamed. In the face-to-face encounter of the examining room, healthcare providers too typically have a hard time bringing up the fact that, say, a particular patient could benefit from learning how to cope better with his or her problems. The act of bringing it up implies a judgment that the patient isn’t coping well and it’s a sensitive topic. People can become upset. Healthcare providers, despite all their training, are just people too and they become nervous in such situations, often too nervous, and so the whole topic never gets raised. It’s easier to focus on the tangibles – the medications, tests, injections, and surgeries. Even if the need for learning better coping strategies does get brought up, it’s not uncommon for patients to refuse it, asserting instead that they actually cope really well, despite evidence to the contrary. It can seem advantageous to deny that you are coping poorly when, in our society, coping poorly is a judgeable offense.

For any or all these reasons, coping-based therapies are commonly considered an after-thought, after the ‘real’ healthcare has been tried and failed. It’s too bad because these therapies can be highly effective.

In an ideal (i.e., stigma-free) world, these therapies would be able to stand on their own and be recognizable as the effective therapies that they are. However, we don’t live in such a world.

All of us need to do our part to promote these therapies so that people who need them gain the liberty to use them and become healthier and happier. That’s what’s really at stake here: because of stigma and ignorance and fear, we as a society don't readily feel free to utilize treatments that can make us healthier and ultimately happier people, even when we experience health problems that can’t entirely be cured.

To this end, at the Institute for Chronic Pain, we make every effort to promote the legitimacy and effectiveness of coping-based rehabilitation treatments for pain. Using common, everyday language, we develop explanations of them that show how and why they can be helpful. We persistently discuss issues related to stigma, particularly how to respond to it so that people can overcome the sensitivity that comes along with openly acknowledging the need to learn how to cope better with the pain that remains chronic on a life-long basis. We then use social media as a means to proliferate these ideas and make them known on an international scale. In short, we promote ideas that change pain.

Our latest effort in this regard is a new content page on our home website. It’s on the nature of coping and how learning to cope better with pain is one of the most powerful interventions we have in the field of chronic pain management.

We hope that you find it helpful. If you do, please pass it on within your social network. Take the risk to acknowledge that there’s nothing wrong with learning how to cope better with a health problem that can’t entirely be cured. You might just help someone else find the help they need.

Author: Murray J. McAllister, PsyD

Date of last modification: 10-30-2015

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