Self-Management

Aug 07, 2015

Often in discussions of chronic pain and its treatments, self-management gets neglected as a viable option. It gets forgotten about. Or perhaps it just never comes to mind when patients or providers talk about the ways to successfully manage pain. Instead, stakeholders in the field tend to focus on the use of medications or interventional procedures or surgeries.

Commentaries on the use of opioid medications often exhibit this lack of consideration of self-management as a viable option. For example, it’s common for stakeholders in the field to hold the use of opioids as self-evidently necessary to successfully manage chronic pain. The notion that self-management is a viable option is never even considered. Indeed, the underlying and unspoken assumption is that it is impossible to manage pain well without the use of these medications. (See, for instance, these thought leaders failing to mention self-management as an option in the face of the various crises that beset the practice of opioid management for chronic pain, here and here).

It’s an odd state of affairs for a major specialty within healthcare to persistently fail to consider, let alone promote, self-management as a viable option. Other specialty areas within healthcare don’t fail to consider the role of self-care. Think of how the fields of diabetes care or cardiology or mental health encourage and promote self-management. Such fields go to great lengths to motivate and teach patients to take ownership and responsibility for their health condition, lose weight, start and maintain an exercise program, quit smoking, eat right, manage stress, assertively resolve conflicts or other problems, and so forth.

The field of chronic pain management instead seems to subtly or not so subtly emphasize the need for patients to rely on healthcare providers to manage pain for them. How often do you hear the assertion that patients will suffer without the pain management that the healthcare system provides? With such assertions, we inadvertently proliferate a belief that it is impossible to self-manage pain well. As such, it hardly ever comes up as a viable option among the many different treatments for managing chronic pain.

Why is that?  

Date of last modification: August 7, 2015

Author: Murray J. McAllister, PsyD

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